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The Ultimate Guide to Tesla Warranty Coverage – Model S, 3, X, Y

As anyone who’s looked into Tesla’s warranty specifics knows, there’s a lot of ground to cover—and we’re here to help break it down for you!

What does Tesla’s warranty cover? Does a used Tesla warranty transfer to a new owner? What is included on the Tesla battery warranty? And the question that’s on every pre-owned Tesla buyer’s mind: can you buy an extended warranty on a used Tesla? (hint: the answer is sometimes, so read on!)

In this Ultimate Guide, we’ll be exploring the Tesla warranty terms model by model, new vs used Tesla warranty situations, and what the Tesla warranty doesn’t cover.  For the following sections, we’ll break down Tesla’s new vehicle warranties on a model-specific level. Next, we’ll explore Tesla’s battery warranty terms, specifics on Tesla’s extended warranty, whether Tesla tires have a warranty, and ways that you can void a Tesla Warranty in the following sections.

If you are just looking for quick answers to Frequently Asked Questions about what’s included in a Tesla warranty, feel free to skip ahead to that section!

Tesla Model S Warranty Explained

The current warranty for a new Model S is called the New Vehicle Limited Warranty, which is a package of three warranty areas: the Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty, the Supplemental Restraint System Limited Warranty, and the Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty.

The Model S Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty is coverage for workmanship or materials defects on anything that Tesla itself manufactures or supplies. They specify “under normal use,” which pretty much means that if parts or materials fail during post-apocalyptic off-roading or an attempt to tow a tank behind your Model S, it’s not Tesla’s fault that the air spring dies or the differential cracks. Tesla’s Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty covers the cost of materials and repair (parts and labor) on defects for 4 years / 50,000 miles and is subject to whichever of those numbers comes first.

Tesla’s Supplemental Restraint System Limited Warranty covers original airbag and seatbelt systems on the Model S installed or made by Tesla. Cost of replacement or repair on these systems is covered under the warranty for up to 5 years / 60,000 miles (again, whichever happens first).

The Tesla Model S Battery and Drive Unit Warranty covers a very generous 8 years or 150,000 miles. We’ll go into a little more depth on specifics for this warranty in its own section (important on the Model S, because the warranty terms for some pre-2020 models vary), but the terms here are pretty generous.

The balance of the warranty transfers owner-to-owner, so if you buy a used Tesla within the years or mileage allotted to the original warranty period, you are still covered (with exceptions: see the salvage and warranty voiding sections for further info). This is great news for a used Model S as there have been a number of small but fairly irritating manufacturing issues over the years. Some of these issues include broken door handles, condensation inside the taillights, yellowing of the touchscreen control panel, and suspension problems.

How does Tesla’s Model S warranty compare to other manufacturers’ warranties? Honestly, Tesla’s warranty is pretty generous. For example, the Chevy Bolt is warrantied bumper-to-bumper for only 3 years or 36,000 miles, and the extra time on the drivetrain component warranty lasts for only 6 years or 100,000 miles. That’s a year less for general coverage and two years and 50,000 miles less for drivetrain components than the Model S.

Tesla Model 3 Warranty 101

Tesla’s Model 3 comes with their New Vehicle Limited Warranty on the day of delivery or from the first day the Model 3 is put into service (such as a loaner during repairs or a company vehicle). The New Vehicle Limited Warranty comes with Tesla’s Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty, their Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty, and their Battery and Drive Unit Warranty (head’s up: the Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty has some variable terms depending on the Model 3 trim level).

Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty for the Model 3 is essentially bumper to bumper coverage for 4 years or 50,000 miles. The warranty covers manufacturing defects, like cosmetic issues on delivery and materials failure under normal driving conditions. It does not cover things like collisions or normal wear and tear (think tires, seat covers, and windshield wiper blades).

The Model 3’s Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty is good for 5 years or 60,000 miles, and it covers the airbag and seatbelt systems originally manufactured or installed (provided) by Tesla.

Tesla’s Battery and Drive Unit Warranty is good for 8 years / 100,000 miles (whichever number the vehicle reaches first) on the Model 3 Standard Range or 8 years / 120,000 miles for the Model 3 Long Range and the Model 3 Performance. We’ll get to the specifics of the battery warranty in a later section, but it basically covers manufacturing defects and damage from a battery fire (with exceptions).

The Model 3’s New Vehicle Limited Warranty is transferable to each owner for the balance of the warranty period (there are coverage exceptions: see the salvage and warranty voiding sections for further info). Obviously, buyers of a used Model 3 should remain aware of warranty conditions, but not many serious warranty issues past 2017 seem to plague the Model 3. The most common issues for the Model 3 involve paint chipping, misaligned panels, and condensation in headlights and taillights.

Is the Model 3’s warranty a good one? We think so. For instance, the Model 3’s Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty lasts longer than the basic warranty on the Nissan Leaf, which has a 3 year/36,000 mile duration. As for the battery warranty, Tesla’s 8 years or 100,000 miles is comparable or better than competitors like Nissan in that it does protect the battery for a very long timeframe (again, 8 years) even if the vehicle isn’t driven past the 100,000 mile mark. That’s pretty awesome news if you are looking for a used Model 3 as a light commuter.

Tesla Model X Warranty – All the Facts

Tesla’s iconic falcon-wing Model X comes with their New Vehicle Limited Warranty. This warranty includes Tesla’s Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty, their Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty, and their Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty.

The Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty on the Model X is essentially bumper to bumper coverage on Tesla manufactured and provided parts, excluding wear and tear items such as windshield wiper blades, brake pads, and the like. This warranty period on the Model X is for 4 years or 50,000 miles. For the Model X, it’s very much worth paying attention to this warranty period and its conditions as there are long-standing reliability issues with the falcon-wing doors that can lead to some unpleasant repair or replacement costs down the road. For this reason, buyers looking for a used Model X should strongly consider getting an extended warranty if the vehicle qualifies (more on that in the Extended Warranty section down below).

The Safety Restraint System (SRS) Limited Warranty covers all parts of the Model X’s airbag and and seatbelt systems that are made or supplied by Tesla, and the coverage lasts for 5 years or 60,000 miles.

Tesla’s Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty for the Model X covers the battery and drivetrain systems for 8 years and 150,000 miles, whichever the vehicle reaches first. This warranty covers manufacturing defects and a minimum battery capacity of 70% retention over the warranty’s time frame, and it also concerns damage as a result of a battery fire. We’ll get more into the specifics of this warranty in the Battery Warranty section down below (important on the Model X, because the warranty terms for some pre-2020 models vary).

How does the warranty on the Model X compare to other EVs? Pretty favorably; while it’s a slightly shorter timeframe and mileage for basic body coverage than it’s direct competitor the Jaguar I-PACE (which covers basic systems for a year or 10,000 miles longer than Tesla), the Model X’s Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty shows Tesla’s confidence in their tech with a generous 8 year / 150,000 miles. That’s 50,000 longer than what the I-PACE offers on its battery, and 3 years / 90,000 miles more than the I-PACE’s drivetrain. That warranty is looking pretty good for the Model X, right?

Tesla Model Y Warranty – Everything You Need to Know

Tesla’s Model Y falls under the New Vehicle Limited Warranty umbrella of warranty subsections that include a Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty, a Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty, and a Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty.

The Model Y’s Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty covers parts manufactured or provided by Tesla for 4 years or 50,000 miles. This includes things like body panels, the touch screen control panel, side mirrors, and so on. It does not include wear and tear items like wiper blades and seating material.

The Model Y’s Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty covers seat belt and air bag systems for up to 5 years or 60,000 miles. Repair and replacement costs for defective materials or workmanship are covered so long as they fall within the guidelines provided by Tesla’s warranty documentation (we’ll cover a few ways you can void your warranty in a later section).

The Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty for the Model Y covers those systems for 8 years or 120,000 miles in the Long Range and Performance trims. This warranty covers damage due to battery fires or unacceptably low battery capacity retention (see the battery warranty section for fuller details on how this works).

How does the Tesla Model Y warranty stand up to competitors? While Tesla doesn’t offer the all-around most generous warranty on the market as competitors like the Hyundai Kona Electric are offering warranty periods longer than 8 years on their drivetrains, Tesla warranties typically stand up to the competition in the broader terms of the warranty agreement. And sometimes longer doesn’t always mean better; unlike the Kona’s warranty, the Tesla warranty is fully transferable between owners. That’s excellent news for used Tesla shoppers (but not such great news for the future used Kona buyer).

Tesla Battery Warranty – What’s Included & What’s Not

Tesla’s Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty covers the battery pack and drivetrain components of all of Tesla’s new vehicles for 8 years and varying mileage depending on the model. The Model X and Model S are covered up to 150,000 miles under this warranty if the car hasn’t already reached 8 years from the first date of sale or service. For the Long Range and Performance versions of the Model 3 and Model Y, the Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty covers up to 120,000 miles. The Standard Range Model 3 is covered up to 100,000 miles. Again, the warranty period ends with whichever of these criteria is reached first: 8 years or the model-specific mileage.

One more factor in this warranty, and one that potential used Tesla buyers should be particularly aware of, is the 70% minimum battery capacity retention clause. Basically, this means that Tesla will replace the battery pack if it falls below 70% of the original range on a full charge within the warranty period for that vehicle.

Overall, Tesla expects its battery packs to retain capacity at an acceptable rate for a very long time (certainly past the 8 year warranty period). Since the vehicles are still so new, it is difficult to say what the overall degradation rate has been for each Tesla model, but with the data that’s currently available on the Model S, there seems to be about a 10-15% degradation in the Model S’s battery capacity over 150,000-200,000 miles. Since the Model S is under warranty for 8 years or 150,000 miles, most vehicles in this range, which have a battery capacity retention of 85% or higher, will not have needed a battery replacement under the warranty conditions and still likely won’t for a long time.

However, when a battery replacement is needed, the out-of-pocket cost at this time is still very high. Battery replacement costs on a Tesla range widely, reportedly anywhere from $10,000-$25,000 for parts and labor. Prices like these make Tesla’s battery degradation warranty an extremely valuable part of the New Vehicle Limited Warranty.

It’s also worth noting that the Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty is not a part of Tesla’s Extended Service Agreement. The Used Vehicle Limited Warranty for what used to be called Tesla CPO vehicles (now just Tesla Used Inventory) doesn’t extend coverage for the battery, either. 8 years, 100,000-150,000 miles. That’s it.

If those prices seem daunting (well, they are), it might help to know that improvements in battery design and production mean that battery prices are continuing to drop. What this means for the future of used Tesla battery replacement is unclear, but we’re hopeful that battery replacement will become more affordable as more Tesla vehicles and more cost-effective battery technologies make it to market.

Price aside, if the battery degradation (the reduction of battery capacity over time) is so low for a Tesla, why worry about the warranty? Well, there are several factors that can heavily affect that degradation percentage. The amount of discharge and charging cycles per day, fast charging, and the environment that the Tesla was used in all play a part in how quickly the battery might degrade, so not all Teslas will experience battery degradation at the same rate. Knowing information on the battery’s warranty period as well as an owner’s driving habits should heavily influence your used Tesla buying decision. For instance, If the pre-owned Tesla in question is likely to have experienced extreme conditions, we’d say it’s a very good idea to make sure the used Tesla’s battery is still under warranty at the time of purchase and for some time in the future. Nobody wants to have an otherwise great car with an unacceptable driving range thanks to battery capacity degradation.

It’s important to note that any damage that results from a battery fire is included in the warranty, though there are a few conditions. First, the battery fire can’t be caused by damage that was previously sustained. This doesn’t mean that a collision that results in a battery fire isn’t covered (it is), but it does mean that if the proper repairs after a collision or accident aren’t made, then Tesla will not be responsible if those damages later lead to a battery fire. Makes sense, right?

So what is not included in the Battery and Drive Unit Warranty? First off, damage from driving on bad roads. Impact from a rock or other road debris that causes battery damage isn’t covered; after all, driving damage isn’t generally considered a manufacturing defect. There’s also damage that can result from failing to follow proper charging procedures that will void the warranty, such as allowing the vehicle to fall to a 0% charge level for an extended period of time or using it as a stationary power source. Tesla also typically doesn’t cover roadside assistance in cases where the owner allows the battery to run completely out. Any attempt to open or service the battery compartment by anyone who does not have Tesla certification also voids the warranty, which is something to keep in mind either when looking at buying a used Tesla that may have been worked on or when contemplating doing some work yourself (really not recommended regardless of warranty; there’s some seriously deadly voltage in those things).

Here’s a look at battery warranty conditions broken down by model:

Model S Battery Warranty

Tesla’s current Model S battery warranty covers the battery pack and components for up to 150,000 miles or 8 years, whichever is reached first, with a minimum battery capacity retention of 70% (or a maximum 30% degradation of capacity since the day of delivery or the vehicle being put into service). Warranty terms include coverage for parts, repair, and labor costs.

This warranty does not include damage due to fire (except in the case of battery fire in the conditions mentioned above), flooding, attempts at service by non-certified personnel, or failure to follow best battery charging practices.

A quick note that should be of interest to buyers looking for a used Model S: Tesla’s pre-2020 battery warranty for the Model S was either an 8 year and unlimited mile warranty for a battery pack 70kWh or greater, or an 8 year and 125,000 mile warranty for a 40 or 60 kWh battery pack.

Model 3 Battery Warranty

Tesla’s battery warranty for the Model 3 covers the battery pack and components for up to 8 years and 100,000 miles on the Model 3 Standard Range, or 120,000 miles on the Long Range or Performance Model 3. A minimum battery capacity retention of 70% is also covered. Terms of the Model 3 battery warranty include coverage for parts, repair, and labor costs.

The Model 3’s battery warranty does not cover damage due to fire (except in the case of battery fire in the conditions mentioned above), failure to follow best battery charging practices, attempts at service by non-certified personnel, or battery compartment flooding.

Model X Battery Warranty

Tesla’s Model X battery warranty coverage extends to the battery pack and related components for up to 8 years and 150,000 miles. Also covered is a minimum battery capacity retention of 70%. Parts, repair, and labor costs related to the battery system are included in the Model X battery warranty terms.

The Model X battery warranty does not cover damage due to attempts at service by non-certified personnel, fire (except in the case of battery fire in the conditions mentioned above), failure to follow best battery charging practices, or battery compartment flooding.

Buyers looking for a used Model X may want to take note of the fact that Tesla’s pre-2020 warranty for the Model X was either an 8 year and unlimited mile warranty for a battery pack 70kWh or greater, or an 8 year and 125,000 mile warranty for a 60 kWh battery pack.

Model Y Battery Warranty

The Performance and Long Range Model Y battery warranty covers the battery pack and components for 120,000 miles or 8 years and minimum battery retention capacity of 70% (or degradation of battery capacity over 30%). Warranty terms include cost coverage for parts, repair, and labor.

The Model Y’s battery warranty does not cover damage due to battery compartment flooding, attempts at service by non-certified personnel, fire (except in the case of battery fire in the conditions mentioned above), or failure to follow best battery charging practices.

Tesla Million Mile Battery Warranty—Is It Real?

Tesla’s Model X and Model S previously (before 2020) came with an 8 year, unlimited mile warranty on the battery for vehicles with a battery pack of 75 kWh and above. Whether or not you could actually drive a million miles in a Tesla before 8 years is up is certainly a fun calculation with a lot of real world factors involved. Realistically, though, this condition of the warranty simply means that Tesla expected their battery to last for at least 8 years under normal (or even a bit more enthusiastic) driving conditions.

Tesla Extended Warranty – How Does it Work?

Used Tesla Warranties

Tesla offers two kinds of warranty that go beyond the New Vehicle Limited Warranty. First, for the Model S and X, Tesla offers an Extended Service Agreement (ESA). The ESA extends manufacturing defect basic coverage of the vehicle for 2-4 years and transfers owner to owner. Second, Tesla offers a Used Vehicle Limited Warranty that extends basic coverage to their inspected Used Inventory cars for an additional year and 10,000 miles.

We’ll get into the specifics of each kind of extended warranty down below:

Used Model S/X Warranties – Extended Service Agreement

Purchase of an Extended Service Agreement (ESA) for the Model S or Model X through Tesla can be made if the vehicle is within 30 days or 1000 miles of its original Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty expiration. The ESA comes in 2 or 4 year options and has two price conditions for each depending on when the ESA is purchased.

Model X: for the 2 year option, the cost is $2,400 if purchased within 180 days of the vehicle’s delivery date, or $2,900 for purchase after 180 of the delivery date. For the 4 year option, the cost is $4,800 if purchased within 180 days of the vehicle’s delivery date, or $5,300 for purchase after 180 of the delivery date.

Model S: for the 2 years option, the cost is $2,100 if purchased within 180 days of the vehicle’s delivery date, or $2,600 for purchase after 180 of the delivery date. For the 4 year option, the cost is $4,250 if purchased within 180 days of the vehicle’s delivery date, or $4,750 for purchase after 180 of the delivery date.

The Extended Service Agreement covers parts and labor for repairs on manufacturing defects. This does not include wear and tear items like tires, brake pads, and so on. Wear and tear can also affect whether or not issues such as certain suspension issues are considered covered under warranty, so it’s worth being aware that the ESA coverage is not as broad as the original New Vehicle Limited Warranty. The ESA also doesn’t cover the battery or drivetrain components; fortunately, those might still be covered for most of the ESA warranty period from their own Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty balance.

There is a $200 deductible for service visits included in the ESA, so that’s part of the cost to consider when you are looking into whether or not purchasing an Extended Service Agreement is right for you.

Fun fact: because of the way Tesla sells the ESA, you can’t bundle it into the price of your vehicle purchase; it has to be purchased separately. One nice feature of this setup is that the Extended Service Agreement cost won’t get factored into the interest of your car payments.

Used Model 3/Y Warranties – Extended Service Agreement

Tesla does not currently offer an Extended Service Agreement for the Model 3 and Model Y. The balance of the New Vehicle Limited Warranty still applies from owner to owner, but there isn’t a way to extend those warranties through Tesla itself. However, if the Model 3 or Model Y is purchased through Tesla’s used inventory, Tesla will add on a Used Vehicle Limited Warranty (or what used to be called the CPO warranty—more on this in the next section).

Tesla Used Vehicle Limited Warranty (formerly CPO Warranty)

While Tesla used to have a Certified Pre-Owned program with a 2-4 year warranty extension, they have changed that practice in recent years. Pre-owned Tesla vehicles purchased directly from Tesla’s Used Inventory come with an additional 1 year / 10,000 miles of basic coverage under the Used Vehicle Limited Warranty after the expiration of the original warranty period. This provision doesn’t extend the battery and drivetrain warranties.

Unlike the Extended Service Agreement, the Used Vehicle Limited Warranty is available on the Model 3 and Model Y in addition to the Model X and Model S. Also, Tesla performs an inspection on each vehicle in its used inventory prior to sale, so you should get some extra peace of mind in knowing that a genuine Tesla tech is willing to sign off on your used Tesla along with the warranty.

It’s worth mentioning that you can’t get a Used Vehicle Limited Warranty without buying straight from Tesla’s Used Inventory, but you can buy a used Tesla Model S or Model X from a private seller that’s still within the limits on the New Vehicle Limited Warranty period and purchase an Extended Service Agreement yourself (see the ESA section of this guide for more details).

Used Tesla Aftermarket (Non-Factory) Extended Warranties

Another warranty option for buyers of used Teslas is an aftermarket or third-party warranty. These warranties are not backed by Tesla and have their own terms and conditions, as well as their own interests (note: keeping your money is pretty high on their interest list). These warranties can be a welcome option if your Tesla isn’t eligible for Tesla’s Extended Service Warranty, but they can also be a source of major frustration.

While there are reputable third-party warranty sellers out there, the third-party warranty market is rife with scammers and lacks stability. When possible, it’s probably better to stick with warranties that come straight from the source with a direct vested interest in keeping you happy with the Tesla brand; in other words, Tesla Motors.

Used Tesla Warranty Transferability

Does a used Tesla’s warranty transfer? The short answer is yes, the balance of Tesla’s warranties can transfer from owner to owner. We’d like to make it clear that Tesla only does this for owners, not through 3rd party dealers. A dealer cannot purchase an Extended Service Agreement (ESA) or carry the balance of either the ESA or the Used Vehicle Limited Warranty, and a Tesla purchased through a 3rd party dealer will not be eligible for an Extended Service Agreement. Additionally, the buyer and seller must file the appropriate paperwork for transferring the ESA or Used Vehicle Limited Warranty through Tesla within 30 days of the sale.

What About the Tesla Roadster Warranty?

The first generation Tesla Roadster Warranty no longer applies; there simply aren’t Roadsters out there that fall within warranty limits. None of them are eligible for Tesla’s Extended Service Warranty, either, so purchasing a used Tesla Roadster typically requires the understanding that you are going to be paying for repairs out of pocket.

Tesla Body Rust Limited Warranty

Tesla takes their materials use seriously, so their Body Rust Limited Warranty covers manufacturing defects that cause perforation (holes) due to resulting rust and corrosion for 12 years and unlimited mileage. This does not include rust and corrosion damage resulting from aftermarket modifications that pierce the vehicle body.

Since the body of the Model S and Model X are aluminum, body rust isn’t that big of an issue. However, the Model Y and Model 3 both have a significant amount of steel in the body, so owners should keep a close eye on areas of concern in case this warranty is needed. Buyers considering a used Tesla from colder climates that salt the roads should also take the Body Rust Limited Warranty warranty into consideration, though Tesla does specify rust due to “exposure to chemical substances” is not covered (road salt, anyone?).

Tesla Parts, Body & Paint Repair Limited Warranty

Tesla’s additional warranty for Tesla-branded replacement parts is an extra complication on top of the general warranty with coverage for 12 months or 12,500 miles for the parts in question, but there are a few basic areas that are covered differently: sheet metal, the drive unit, the high voltage battery, wall connectors, and the touchscreen / media control unit. Each has a unique limit to its warranty that’s listed in detail on Tesla’s website.

If you are looking into purchasing a used Tesla that has already seen some repairs, it’s definitely worth your time to find out when repairs were made and what additional warranty coverage may apply to the replacement parts.

Tesla Tire Warranty – Are Tires Covered?

The tires on a Tesla aren’t covered by the New Vehicle Limited Warranty, Used Vehicle Limited Warranty, or the Extended Service Agreement. Tires are considered a “normal wear and tear item” and aren’t manufactured by Tesla. Even though Tesla supplies the tires, they are not actually considered a tire dealer. It’s up to the manufacturer of the tire (Michelin, Continental, Goodyear, etc) to honor warranty claims.

Salvage Tesla Vehicles – How Does the Warranty Apply?

If a Tesla vehicle is designated as salvaged, considered a total loss by the insurance company, or damaged by fire or flooding—basically any time the vehicle has suffered massive damage at the hands of nature or humans and given a salvage title—then it is no longer covered by Tesla’s New Vehicle Limited Warranty no matter how many miles or years the car has been in service. This includes Tesla vehicles with damaged VIN numbers or odometer systems; after all, if Tesla can’t identify the vehicle or accurately calculate mileage, why would they pay to fix it?

Things That Can Void a Tesla Warranty

We’ve discussed a few of these details in previous sections, but here are a few things that can void Tesla’s warranty, broken down by warranty area:

Battery: attempts to service the battery area by non-certified personnel, non-adherence to battery charging guidelines, using the vehicle as a stationary power source, flood or fire damage (exclusions apply for battery fires within limitations), collision or general damage that has intentionally not been repaired that leads to future battery failure.

Drive Unit: loading the vehicle with cargo or passengers past its stated limitations, failure to make repairs, aftermarket modification* (see below for further discussion on this point)

Basic vehicle: aftermarket modification*, failure to provide basic maintenance, failure to follow up on service alerts, failure to update software when prompted

SRS: Aftermarket modification*, failure to comply with recall advisories

Corrosion and Rust: Damage as a result of perforation by aftermarket modification*, undercoating or rust-proofing

Please note that many of these items are applicable to more than one warranty area.

*Regarding aftermarket modifications:

Under the terms of the Magnusson-Moss law in the US, manufacturers are generally prohibited from using tie-in sales to maintain warranty conditions. This means that though the Tesla warranty specifically states that aftermarket modification of the vehicle may void the warranty, this portion of the warranty conditions could be legally disputable. While an aftermarket modification could genuinely cause damage because it does not meet Tesla’s design criteria, Tesla could also use aftermarket modification as an excuse for not providing coverage.

For example, could an aftermarket wheel void the terms of Tesla’s warranty in the event of suspension failure that should be covered? Under Tesla’s warranty terms, damage potentially caused by aftermarket wheels is a warranty-voiding situation, but under the terms of Magnusson-Moss, that could be disputable because insisting that the wheel only be manufactured by Tesla for warranty to be maintained could be considered a tie-in sales tactic.

Long story short: it’s complicated. The general recommendation is that these kinds of situations be handled out of court, but Magnusson-Moss law provides consumers with a legal way forward if an agreement can’t be reached on a warranty dispute.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About Tesla Warranties

Need quick answers to Tesla warranty questions? If you answered yes, then this FAQ section is for you!

Also—if you have further warranty questions about new and used Teslas that aren’t covered in this guide or the FAQ section, please feel free to drop us a line. We love to do what we can to help out our fellow Tesla enthusiasts!

What does a Tesla warranty cover?

Tesla’s warranty covers repairs and replacement costs related to manufacturing defects from parts that Tesla either makes or supplies as a part of the vehicle. This does not include wear and tear items such as tires, seat materials, brake pads, etc. It does include damage from a battery fire (with situational limitations).

What’s the warranty on a Tesla?

Currently, the warranty on a Tesla is called the New Vehicle Limited Warranty, which includes the Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty (4 years or 50,000 miles), the Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty (5 years or 60,000 miles), and the Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty (8 years or 100,000-150,000 depending on the vehicle model).

Can you buy an extended warranty on a used Tesla?

Yes, you can buy an extended warranty on a used Tesla straight from Tesla itself under the right conditions, but only for the Model S and Model X. The Extended Service Agreement (ESA) is a 2 or 4 year extension of coverage (excluding the Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty) that can be purchased if your Tesla is under the limit of 30 days or 1000 miles past its New Vehicle Limited Warranty coverage. Alternative 3rd party options are also available.

What is the Tesla Model 3 warranty?

Tesla’s warranty on the Model 3 is called the New Vehicle Limited Warranty which includes their Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty (4 years / 50,000 miles), Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty (5 years, 60,000 miles), and Battery and Drive Unit Warranty (8 years / 100,000 miles for the Standard Range, or 8 years / 120,000 miles for the Long Range and Performance Model 3).

Does Tesla offer an extended warranty?

Yes, they do, at least for the Model S and Model X! Tesla’s extended warranty is called the Extended Service Agreement (ESA). You can extend your coverage for 2 to 4 years if your Tesla is under the limit of 30 days or 1000 miles past its New Vehicle Limited Warranty coverage. Please note that Tesla does not extend its Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty.

If I buy a used Tesla, will the warranty transfer?

Yes, the balance of a used Tesla’s warranty under the terms and conditions of the original warranty agreement will transfer directly between owners. The exception to this is for sales through 3rd party dealers, where the Extended Service Agreement or Used Vehicle Limited Warranty will not transfer to the next owner.

How long is the battery warranty on a Tesla?

Tesla’s Battery and Drive Unit Warranty covers 8 years or 100,000-150,000 miles depending on the vehicle model, including a guarantee of a minimum 70% battery capacity.

Does Tesla have a lifetime warranty?

No, there is no lifetime warranty on a Tesla, but for some Model X and Model S vehicles delivered before 2020 with battery packs rated at 70 kWh or higher, there is an unlimited mileage warranty condition on the battery. While this isn’t a lifetime warranty, it is a generous warranty situation for buyers of pre-owned Teslas.

Can you extend Tesla’s warranty?

Yes, you can extend your Tesla’s warranty with their Extended Service Agreement that increases the Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty for 2 to 4 years past the original warranty period. However, this only applies to the Model S and the Model X.

How long is Tesla’s warranty?

Starting at delivery or the first day of service, the New Vehicle Limited Warranty covers 4 years or 50,000 miles for the terms of the Basic Vehicle Limited Warranty, 4 years or 60,000 miles for the terms of the Safety Restraint System Limited Warranty, and 8 years or 100,000-150,000 miles (depending on the vehicle model) for the Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty.

How long is the battery warranty on a Tesla?

Tesla’s Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty covers 8 years or 100,000-150,000 miles depending on the vehicle model, and battery capacity is guaranteed at a minimum of 70% for that time period.

How much does a Tesla extended warranty cost?

Tesla’s extended warranty is called the Extended Service Agreement (ESA), and it comes in 2-4 year amounts. Currently, the ESA is only offered on the Model S and Model X.

Model X: for 2 years, the cost is $2,400 if purchased within 180 days of the vehicle’s delivery date, or $2,900 for purchase after 180 of the delivery date. For the 4 years, the cost is $4,800 if purchased within 180 days of the vehicle’s delivery date, or $5,300 for purchase after 180 of the delivery date.

Model S: for 2 years, the cost is $2,100 if purchased within 180 days of the vehicle’s delivery date, or $2,600 for purchase after 180 of the delivery date. For the 4 years, the cost is $4,250 if purchased within 180 days of the vehicle’s delivery date, or $4,750 for purchase after 180 of the delivery date.

What things can void your Tesla warranty?

Examples of things that can void your Tesla warranty include failure to provide proper maintenance and attention to service notifications or to install updates, attempting to access or repair the battery pack by non-certified personnel, loading the vehicle over its stated capacity, and aftermarket modification that results in damage.

Are Teslas reliable?

We think so! However, reliability is difficult to quantify with only a few years of data. While news stories abound about Tesla’s manufacturing glitches regarding panel misalignment and paint problems, the main battery and drive components seem to hold up remarkably well and don’t get nearly as much bad press. For what it’s worth, Consumer Reports surveys found that Tesla owners are overall highly satisfied with their vehicles.

Should I purchase an extended warranty on my Tesla?

It depends. Tesla’s own Extended Service Agreement (ESA) is only offered on the Model S and Model X, so if we’re talking about a Model 3 or Model Y, there isn’t an extended warranty option except through a third-party. For the Model S and Model X, the relatively high out of pocket costs of repairs could make the ESA worth your while, especially if you are considering buying a pre-owned Tesla and need that extra peace of mind.

 

Does Tesla offer an extended warranty on Model 3 or Model Y?

Yes, the Model S and Model Y are both eligible for Tesla’s Extended Service Agreement (ESA). The ESA covers a 2-4 year period and extends basic vehicle coverage past the terms of the New Vehicle Limited Warranty. However, it does not extend the Battery and Drive Unit Limited Warranty for the Model 3 or the Model Y.

Is it expensive to repair an out of warranty Tesla?

It can be. For example, a full battery replacement, including parts and labor, can cost somewhere in the $10,000-$20,000 range. However, the battery is the heart of the EV and is the most expensive part. Other repairs tend to run lower, but in general repair costs on an out of warranty Tesla can be on the pricey side.

Are third-party Tesla warranties any good?

While the best option will always be a warranty straight from Tesla, a third-party warranty may be a decent option when buying from a dealership since Tesla’s own extended warranties do not apply on Teslas bought through a dealer. However, remember that the third-party warrantor has only your money as its vested interest, not the reputation of brand or product. Resolving disputes with third-party warranty companies can be a major hassle. And who hasn’t heard of the third-party extended warranty scam scene?

Bottom line: there may be decent third-party options out there, but we don’t recommend them.

What is the Tesla Model 3 battery replacement cost?

The price for a replacement on a Model 3 battery is subject to individual situations, but there have been reports of costs as high as $16,000 for parts and labor.

How much is a Tesla Model S battery replacement?

Exact costs for replacing the Tesla Model S battery out of pocket aren’t clear, though some data from owners suggest the cost of replacing the battery pack is somewhere between $10,000-$20,000 for parts and labor. The good news is that many Teslas are still within their original battery warranty periods.