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Tesla Colors – The Ultimate Guide – Model S, 3, X, Y

Tesla Color Guide

Not only are Teslas some of the best-looking cars on the road, but they’ve also got amazingly beautiful colors to choose from. Whether it’s their iconic Red Multi-Coat or the striking (but sadly discontinued) Obsidian Black Metallic, there are a lot of gorgeous color options.

That said, if you’re in the market for a used Tesla, it can be quite difficult to figure out which colors were available across certain models and years.

In order to help used Tesla buyers (and anyone else looking to research Tesla colors over time), we created the Ultimate Guide to Tesla Colors—everything you’ve ever wanted to know about Tesla paint (and interior) color options!

Select a specific Tesla Model from our table of contents to quickly jump to that section, or feel free to browse the entire page and become overwhelmed by the detailed history and intriguing variety of Tesla colors!

Tesla Model S Red
Tesla Model S Red

Tesla Model S Colors

The Model S is Tesla’s longest-running production vehicle, so it’s no surprise that there has been a wide range of interior and exterior color options available over the years.

And because the first Model S rolled off the assembly line in 2012, there are a lot of options (including battery and drive configurations) that are no longer available—which makes it even harder to know which models had which available interior/exterior colors.

To make this guide as complete as possible, we’ve laid out the different Model S colors (both interior and exterior) for all years, batteries, and drive combinations (70D, P85D, 100D, etc.) below in an easy-to-use tabbed format. Just click (or tap) on the tab you’re interested in to reveal all of the Tesla Model S colors and trim levels for that specific year.

2015 Model S P85DL Silver Metallic
2015 Model S P85DL Silver Metallic

2012 Model S Colors

Being the first production year of the Model S, 2012 marked an important point in Tesla history, with the launch of what would come to arguably be the world’s most groundbreaking electric sedan.

Contrary to other electric vehicles, the Model S was gorgeous, sleek, fast, and combined all of the best features of traditional luxury gas vehicles into a cutting-edge electric car.

Five different battery variants (40, 60, 85, P85, and P85+) were produced in 2012, with nine exterior color choices, and three interior color options.

Exterior Colors

Anza Brown Metallic
Anza Brown Metallic
Catalina White
Catalina White
Monterey Blue Metallic
Monterey Blue Metallic
San Simeon Silver Metallic
San Simeon Silver Metallic
Sequoia Green Metallic
Sequoia Green Metallic
Shasta Pearl White
Shasta Pearl White
Sierra Black
Sierra Black
Signature Red
Signature Red
Tiburon Gray Metallic
Tiburon Gray Metallic

Interior Colors

Black
Black

(Leather or Multi-Pattern Textile)

Gray
Gray

(Leather)

Tan
Tan

(Leather)

2013 Model S Colors

2013 marked the second year of production for the Model S, with the most notable change being dual motor configurations. The full list of available battery and motor options for 2013 includes 60, 85, P85, P85+, 85D, P85D, and P85DL.

Some colors were removed, and the naming conventions were also simplified, with two of Tesla’s most popular colors to this day—Pearl White Multi-Coat, and Red Multi-Coat being added for the 2013 model year.

Exterior Colors

Blue Metallic
Blue Metallic
Brown Metallic
Brown Metallic
Gray Metallic
Gray Metallic
Green Metallic
Green Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Silver Metallic
Silver Metallic
Solid Black
Solid Black
Solid White
Solid White

Interior Colors

Black
Black

(Leather or Multi-Pattern Textile)

Gray
Gray

(Leather)

Tan
Tan

(Leather)

2014 Model S Colors

2014 was a groundbreaking year for the Model S with the addition of Autopilot for the first time, paving the way for Full Self-Driving (FSD) and semi-autonomous operation.

In terms of batteries and trim levels, the most notable change for 2014 was the addition of the venerable performance models. The entire Model S line up for 2014 includes 60, 85, P85, P85+, 85D, P85D, and P85DL with the removal of the 40 kWh battery pack option.

The most notable addition to the Model S lineup for 2014 is the “D” (dual motor) configuration, available for the first time. All interior and exterior colors were unchanged from the previous model year.

Exterior Colors

Blue Metallic
Blue Metallic
Brown Metallic
Brown Metallic
Gray Metallic
Gray Metallic
Green Metallic
Green Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Silver Metallic
Silver Metallic
Solid Black
Solid Black
Solid White
Solid White

Interior Colors

Black
Black

(Leather or Multi-Pattern Textile)

Gray
Gray

(Leather)

Tan
Tan

(Leather)

2015 Model S Colors

2015 represented another exciting year for the Model S with the addition of a 90 kWh battery option, providing up to 270 miles of range.

The lineup of available battery combinations grew once again in 2015 to include a 70 kWh battery pack as well. The total number of battery/drive configurations grew to 11 (60, 70, 70D, 85, 85D, P85D, P85DL, 90, 90D, P90D, P90DL).

In terms of 2015 Tesla Model S exterior colors, two notable options were added—Midnight Silver Metallic (still available today), and one of our favorites, Obsidian Black Metallic (discontinued).

Exterior Colors

Blue Metallic
Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Gray Metallic
Gray Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Silver Metallic
Silver Metallic
Solid Black
Solid Black
Solid White
Solid White
Titanium Metallic
Titanium Metallic

Interior Colors

Black
Black

(Leather or Multi-Pattern Textile)

Gray
Gray

(Leather)

Tan
Tan

(Leather)

2016 Model S Colors

2016 marked an interesting year for the Model S, with the addition of Autopilot hardware version 2.0 (HW2/AP2) in October 2016, as well as the addition of the 100 kWh battery pack.

With the largest line up of all model years, 2016 included a whopping 17 battery/drive/software combinations (60, 60D, 70, 70D, 75, 75D, 85, 85D, P85D, P85DL, 90, 90D, P90D, P90DL, 100D, P100D, and P100DL) which Tesla would soon realize they needed to scale down in order to optimize production.

Beyond the battery/drive unit changes, Tesla removed Blue Metallic and Gray Metallic as exterior color options, and also introduced a switch to vegan leather (synthetic) seating material.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Silver Metallic
Silver Metallic
Solid Black
Solid Black
Solid White
Solid White
Titanium Metallic
Titanium Metallic

Interior Colors

Black
Black

(Leather, Vegan Leather/Synthetic, or Multi-Pattern Textile)

Gray
Gray

(Leather)

Tan
Tan

(Leather)

2017 Model S Colors

Realizing that they needed to streamline production and reduce the number of Model S configurations available, Tesla dropped the 85 kWh battery options for 2017 (leaving 60, 60D, 70, 70D, 75, 75D, 90, 90D, P90D, P90DL, 100D, P100D, and P100DL).

In addition to dropping the 85 kWh battery pack, they also removed two more relatively unpopular colors—Titanium Metallic (arguably the least favorable Tesla color), and Solid White (not nearly as good-looking as Pearl White Multi-Coat in our opinion).

Tesla also removed the gray leather seating option and added a vegan leather (synthetic) Ultra White choice as well (which paved the way for the future Black and White option).

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Silver Metallic
Silver Metallic
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

Black
Black

(Leather, Vegan Leather/Synthetic, or Multi-Pattern Textile)

Tan
Tan

(Leather)

Ultra White
Ultra White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

2018 Model S Colors

The 2018 model year marked a further reduction of battery pack/drive unit configurations, with Tesla cutting the 90 kWh battery pack leaving only 8 options (60, 60D, 75, 75D, 90D, 100D, P100D, and P100DL).

In terms of exterior Model S colors, there were no changes from the previous year, with 2018 being (unfortunately) the final year of Obsidian Black Metallic.

Notably on the interior, Tesla removed the Ultra white option and transitioned to their core set of interior colors (All Black, Black and White, and Cream) that they’re still currently using. They also removed the Multi-Pattern cloth interior option, and completely eliminated animal hide leather in favor of an all synthetic option.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Silver Metallic
Silver Metallic
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Cream
Cream

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

2019 Model S Colors

The 2019 model year represented Tesla’s shift to offering even fewer battery pack/drive unit options, with all Model S vehicles coming standard with AWD/dual motors, leaving 75D, 100D, P100D, and P100DL as options.

Part way through the year, Tesla dropped the numerical kWh naming convention and moved to using words, with Standard Range, Long Range, Long Range Plus, and Performance being the new Model S trim levels.

On top of that, Tesla further simplified the 2019 Model S exterior colors, removing Silver Metallic (unfortunately), while all interior color options stayed the same as the previous year.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Cream
Cream

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

2020 Model S Colors

2020 represented the biggest reduction of Model S variants in the history of the vehicle with only 3 battery options—Long Range, Long Range Plus, and Performance (with AWD standard now).

The battery pack options were further cut down to Long Range Plus and Performance for a large part of 2020, with the Model S Plaid option being added in September 2020 after Tesla Battery Day.

As of 2020, Tesla has not changed their core set of Model S interior or exterior colors, seeming to be at a comfortable place with production while still offering buyers a meaningful level of variety.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Cream
Cream

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

2021 Model S Colors

As it currently stands, the 2021 Tesla Model S line up offers 3 variants—Long Range Plus, Performance, and Plaid (the only thing beyond Ludicrous), which remains unchanged from 2020.

In terms of interior/exterior 2021 Tesla Model S colors, there are no changes from the previous year. It’s possible that Tesla may offer special options for the Plaid Model S in the future, but currently this remains to be seen.

Tesla’s core set of five colors has proven to be the best balance of buyer choice and production optimization, and the 2021 Model S interior colors remain unchanged from the previous year as well.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Cream
Cream

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Best Model S Color

There’s a lot of debate as to what the best Tesla Model S color is—and of course, everyone has their own opinions. On top of that, there’s debate as to what “best” really means—the best color in terms of hiding scratches may not be the best-looking color when clean, or the best color for winter climates.

To make sure we cover all bases, let’s take a look at the best Tesla Model S color for a variety of situations.

2014 Model S 85 Pearl White Multi-Coat
2014 Model S 85 Pearl White Multi-Coat

Best Tesla Model S Color for Hiding Scratches

Hands down, this is probably Pearl White Multi-Coat, with the runner up being Silver Metallic. Because Silver Metallic is discontinued, we’re going to give this one to Pearl White Multi-Coat.

The combination of the metallic white and the fact that most scratches are a light/white color really makes this one a scratch hider!

Easiest Tesla Model S Color to Take Care Of (Or Keep Clean)

The easiest Tesla Model S color to take care of is definitely Silver Metallic (discontinued), or Pearl White Mult-Coat if we have to pick a color that’s currently in production.

White and silver do a great job of hiding dirt (especially in the winter), as well as scratches. From there, it becomes a bit harder in terms of color care, with Solid Black being the hardest Tesla color to take care of (or keep clean).

Best-Looking Model S Color During the Day

Bright sunlight is a place where Deep Blue Metallic really shines, and is probably the best Tesla Model S color in daylight. Our runner up pick here would be Tesla’s iconic Red Multi-Coat.

Best-Looking Model S Color at Night

This definitely goes to Solid Black—there’s nothing classier than an all black car in the moonlight—it just doesn’t get any better than that.

Best Tesla Model S Color Overall

We have to give this one to Obsidian Black Metallic. It’s really a shame they don’t make it anymore, because it is an absolutely gorgeous color.

It does about as good of a job as any black can in hiding scratches/imperfections thanks to the metallic flakes, and absolutely shines during the day with a little extra razzle dazzle over Solid Black (which should really be wrapped with PPF in any sort of winter climate state). Yep—Obsidian Black Metallic is the best Tesla Model S color.

But if we had to pick a color still being produced in 2021? It would be a toss up between Pearl White Multi-Coat, and Red Multi-Coat as the Tesla Multi-Coat process is absolutely gorgeous.

Tesla Model 3 Sunset
Tesla Model 3 Sunset

Tesla Model X Colors

Tesla’s Model X was an absolutely revolutionary vehicle—with its balletic gull wing doors and roller coaster-like acceleration, it was a futuristic head-turner from the start of its manufacture in 2016.

The color convention for the Model X was quite similar to the Model S, considering they’re built in the same factory and on the same production line. It started out with more colors in the beginning and then dwindled to Tesla’s famous core five that they’re currently using (Deep Blue Metallic, Midnight Silver Metallic, Pearl White Multi-Coat, Red Multi-Coat, and Solid Black).

If you’re looking for a used Model X (or just trying to do some research on Tesla colors in general)—we’ve got you covered. The following is our complete guide to Tesla Model X colors—simply click (or tap) on one of the model year tabs below to see every possible interior and exterior color option for the Model X in each year.

2017 Model X 90D Red Multi-Coat
2017 Model X 90D Red Multi-Coat

2016 Model X Colors

2016 marked the first year of Tesla’s Model X—an SUV like the world had never seen before. And the Model X made a big splash, with nine battery/drive options (60D, 70D, 75D, 90D, P90D, P90DL, 100D, P100D, and P100DL).

Performance and Ludicrous options were offered right away on the Model X as they had already been in production for over a year on the Model S. Different from the Model S, the X was never offered in a rear wheel drive (RWD) configuration.

In terms of 2016 interior and exterior color options, the Model X mirrored the Model S options with one exception—the first 1000 vehicles had the exterior paint color option of Signature Red, a rare, rich red that Tesla had only offered one other time (the 2012 Model S).

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Signature Red
Signature Red
Silver Metallic
Silver Metallic
Solid Black
Solid Black
Solid White
Solid White
Titanium Metallic
Titanium Metallic

Interior Colors

Black
Black

(Leather, Vegan Leather/Synthetic, or Multi-Pattern Textile)

Tan
Tan

(Leather)

Ultra White
Ultra White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

2017 Model X Colors

2017 represented a reduction of Model X options as Tesla sought to streamline their production while still offering buyers a plentiful range of choices.

Tesla cut the 70 and 75 kWh battery packs from the Model X line up, leaving the options for 2017 at 75D, 90D, P90D, P90DL, 100D, P100D, and P100DL.

In terms of interior and exterior color choices, Tesla removed three colors from the Model X line up (Signature Red, Solid White, and Titanium Metallic). Black and White was also added as an interior color option, as well as Cream, while Ultra White was removed during the 2017 model year.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Silver Metallic
Silver Metallic
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Cream
Cream

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

2018 Model X Colors

2018 saw a further reduction in Model X battery options, with the total number being cut to just four (75D, 100D, P100D, and P100DL).

Exterior colors choices remained the same for the 2018 Model X, with this year being the last for both Obsidian Black Metallic and Silver Metallic.

Interior choices were further reduced, eliminating the off-menu option of Multi-Pattern Textile seats, and fully eliminating animal hide leather in favor of vegan (synthetic) leather.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Silver Metallic
Silver Metallic
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Cream
Cream

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

2019 Model X Colors

In 2019, Tesla changed the naming convention for the Model X battery options, ditching the kWh naming convention (75D, 100D, P100D, P100DL) and moving to a less numerical option. The available battery options for 2019 were Standard Range, Long Range, and Performance.

Tesla dropped Obsidian Black Metallic and Silver Metallic as exterior colors, and continued with the same core five colors that they’re currently using, as well as the same three interior color options.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Cream
Cream

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

2020 Model X Colors

2020 saw a further reduction in the number of available Model X batteries/trim levels, with the first part of the model year offering Long Range, Long Range Plus, and Performance.

Later in 2020, the Long Range variant would be dropped in favor of the Long Range Plus option, which carried through to the end of the model year.

No significant exterior or interior color changes were made for the 2020 Model X as Tesla had them pretty well dialed-in, striking a good balance between optimizing production and offering a range of choices for buyers.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Cream
Cream

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

2021 Model X Colors

There are no surprises or meaningful changes to the battery and color options (both interior and exterior) for the Model X in 2021.

This may change as the year progresses, but currently Tesla has chosen to stick with their five core exterior colors, and three core interior colors.

The interior remains animal leather free (and we don’t anticipate this changing), with vegan leather (synthetic) as the only option.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Cream
Cream

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Best Model X Color

The Model X is a popular vehicle—there’s no doubt about that. And because of its popularity, there has been much debate about what the best Model X color is, and why.

Of course, this is a subjective answer—so we’ll answer it subjectively (with some reasoning, of course). But while we’re at it, we’ll also jump in and answer some of the finer questions like—which Model X color is the easiest to take care of, and which is the best at hiding scratches.

This way—if you’re looking for a used Model X (or simply researching Tesla colors), you’ll have all the info you need to choose the best color for you.

2018 Model X 75D Deep Blue Metallic
2018 Model X 75D Deep Blue Metallic

Best Tesla Model X Color for Hiding Scratches

When it comes to hiding scratches, you definitely want a lighter color because the contrast between light and dark colors really highlight scratches and imperfections.

With the Model X, this means Pearl White Multi-Coat or Silver Metallic. And since Silver Metallic was discontinued in 2018, we’re going to say that Pearl White Multi-Coat is the best color for hiding scratches on the Model X.

Easiest Tesla Model X Color to Take Care Of (Or Keep Clean)

Similar to hiding scratches, colors that are easier to take care of are those with lighter tints (whites, silvers, etc.).

So, we’re going to say again that Pearl White Multi-Coat is the easiest Tesla Model X color to take care of by far. It hides dirt in the winter, hides scratches (see above), and also hides imperfections while maintaining a really unique, pearlescent sheen. If we had to choose a runner up, it would be Silver Metallic, but since that isn’t made anymore, we’re barring it from the number one spot in this category.

Best-Looking Model X Color in Daylight

On a Model X, the best-looking color in the direct sun or daylight has to be Deep Blue Metallic. We’re not as big of a fan of this color in darker light as it tends to have a purple-ish hue, but in the direct sun it can’t be beat—it’s really an electric (no pun intended) color.

Best-Looking Model X Color at Night Time

The best color on a Model X at night is definitely Solid Black. It’s like wearing a tuxedo out to a black tie affair. It’s timeless, elegant, and striking—there’s really no runner up in this category as it’s just about impossible to outclass Solid Black here.

Best Overall Tesla Model X Color

This is a tough one, because each Tesla model (S, 3, X, Y) shows off the colors differently. We strongly believe that Obsidian Black Metallic was the best Model S and Model 3 color ever, but for Model X it’s a little different. The size of the X shows some colors better than others.

With that said—we think Pearl White Multi-Coat is the best Model X color. Something about the curves on the X just catch the light in the right ways with this color.

Tesla Model X Taillight
Tesla Model X Taillight

Tesla Model 3 Colors

There’s no doubt that the Model 3 is a groundbreaking electric vehicle—and quite possibly the car that made Tesla. Even Elon has said that the fate of the company was hinged on the Model 3 at one point. So, the Model 3 was definitely a pivotal car, despite being the second-newest Tesla kid on the block.

Because the Model 3 is relatively new (in the Tesla universe anyway), there isn’t a big variation among exterior and interior colors like with the Model S, but as a used Model 3 buyer (or anyone doing research on Model 3 vehicles), it definitely helps to have all the years/colors/models laid out in an easy-to-understand format.

So, just like with the other Tesla vehicles, we created a section below to help prospective buyers understand the color options (both interior and exterior). Just click (or tap) the tabs to see all available Tesla Model 3 colors for any year.

2021 Model 3 Long Range AWD Pearl White Multi-Coat
2021 Model 3 Long Range AWD Pearl White Multi-Coat

2017 Model 3 Colors

2017 was a short production year for the Model 3, but it marked the begging of an epic time for Tesla, with the company finally bringing an affordable car to the masses.

The only available model during that year was Long Range RWD, with an astounding range of 310 miles and a never-before-seen single center screen (vs. the Model S/X).

In terms of exterior colors on the 2017 Model 3, Tesla had a short set of seven colors that represents their (almost) core set; Obsidian Black Metallic and Silver Metallic would last until 2018. Interior colors for the 2017 Model 3 were limited to All Black as the only option.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Silver Metallic
Silver Metallic
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

2018 Model 3 Colors

2018 marked the first full year of production for the Model 3, including four different battery/drive variants—Mid Range RWD, Long Range RWD, Long Range AWD, and Performance AWD.

Unlike Model S/X, Tesla sought to keep options simple with the Model 3, offering only one dashboard option (vs. the multitude offered with other Teslas). This helped streamline production, and create the signature look of the Model 3 dashboard.

Tesla made no changes to the 2018 Model 3 exterior colors, but did add Black and White—an additional interior color for a total of two options.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Silver Metallic
Silver Metallic
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

2019 Model 3 Colors

2019 was the year where the Model 3 lineup in terms of battery and drive options grew to its largest size, and then began to shrink, similar to what it is today.

In 2019, Tesla had six battery and drive options available for the Model 3—Standard Range RWD, Standard Range Plus RWD, Mid Range RWD, Long Range RWD, Long Range AWD, and Performance AWD.

Tesla also removed Obsidian Black Metallic and Silver Metallic for the 2019 model year, but kept the interior color options the same.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

2020 Model 3 Colors

2020 saw a further reduction of Model 3 drive and battery options, cutting down to the four core Model 3 variants that are available today—Standard Range RWD, Standard Range Plus RWD, Long Range AWD, and Performance AWD.

Tesla made no changes to the 2020 Model 3 exterior paint colors, except a switch from Solid Black being the standard “free” color, to Pearl White Multi-Coat being the standard color. The interior color options remained the same at two—All Black, or Black and White.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

2021 Model 3 Colors

2021 marked a new year for the Model 3 with almost no big changes so far, except a light refresh which included a new, matte finish center console, and the change to blacked out exterior trim instead of chrome (to match the Model Y styling).

Tesla also kept their core five Model 3 exterior colors the same, as well as the two interior colors (All Black, or Black and White).

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Best Model 3 Color

What’s the best Model 3 color? That’s a good question, and something many people across the web have asked. The truth is that it’s really subjective, and also depends to an extent on what you mean by “best.”

Are you talking about the best Model 3 color in terms of its stunning looks? The best Model 3 color for the winter (and hiding the sand/salt)? The easiest color to care for year-round?

In order to cover all bases here, let’s take a look at the best Model 3 color in a variety of scenarios…

2018 Model 3 Long Range RWD Red Multi-Coat
2018 Model 3 Long Range RWD Red Multi-Coat

Best Tesla Model 3 Color for Hiding Scratches

Generally speaking, the best colors for hiding scratches are those that are lighter—whites, silvers, etc. The Model 3 used to come in Silver Metallic, but that color is no more, so the best Model 3 color for hiding scratches that’s currently available is definitely Pearl White Multi-Coat.

Easiest Tesla Model 3 Color to Take Care Of (Or Keep Clean)

Similar to colors that hide scratches, the easiest colors to take care of (and keep clean) are usually the lighter ones as well. Silvers, whites, and even sometimes grays. Midnight Silver Metallic is a relatively easy color to take care of, but the easiest Model 3 colors to take care of is definitely Pearl White Multi-Coat (the winner again).

Best-Looking Model 3 Color in Daylight

Similar to our color opinion about the Model X, we’re going to say that Deep Blue Metallic is by far the best overall Tesla color in direct sunlight, and this is also the case with the Model 3. It’s brilliant, electric, and if you haven’t seen in in the high noon sun, you definitely should!

Best-Looking Model 3 Color at Night Time

This is pretty universal across all Tesla vehicles, but the best-looking color at night time is always going to be Solid Black. It’s sleek and classy, like a grand piano or a tuxedo—and there’s nothing that looks better a night (which you wouldn’t typically think from a dark color, but trust us—this is the one).

Best Overall Tesla Model 3 Color

Overall, the best Model 3 color that isn’t available anymore is Obsidian Black Metallic. It’s got all the benefits of black, but few of the drawbacks because the metallic flake is good at hiding scratches, and gives it some extra pop that Solid Black just doesn’t have.

That said, Obsidian Black Metallic (or OBM as it’s known in the Tesla community), hasn’t been available since 2018, so we’d have to say that Pearl White Multi-Coat is the best overall Model 3 color that’s available now.

White Tesla Model Y
White Tesla Model Y

Tesla Model Y Colors

Tesla’s Model Y is without a doubt a groundbreaking vehicle, bringing an affordable electric SUV to the masses.

Building on the Model 3 platform, the Model Y offers more seating, larger cargo space, and a higher ride height (all the things you’d expect from an SUV vs. a sedan).

In terms of colors, the Model Y essentially follows directly in line the Model 3 colors (both interior and exterior). The Model Y colors are limited to Tesla’s core five colors, and two interior colors (as you can see below).

2020 Model Y Performance Pearl White Multi-Coat
2020 Model Y Performance Pearl White Multi-Coat

2020 Model Y Colors

The Model Y marked a continuation of Tesla’s affordable line, with the world’s first compact EV SUV in 2020. This was a much-anticipated vehicle, offering up to 326 miles of range, and a 0-60 time of 3.5s in the Performance version.

In terms of color options (both interior and exterior), the Model Y took cues from the Model 3 and only offered Tesla’s core five exterior color options, and two interior color options.

The most notable exterior difference between the Model Y and Model 3 was the addition of blacked out window trim (vs. chrome), which was unified in late 2020.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

2021 Model Y Colors

2021 has essentially been a “duplicate” year for the Model Y in terms of both features (battery, etc.) and colors (interior and exterior).

This may change as the year progresses, but currently the options remain unchanged with Tesla’s five core colors, and two interior options (All Black, or Black and White).

The Model 3 has taken on some of the Model Y changes (blacked out window trim, etc.), but no meaningful Model Y changes have been made for 2021 as of now.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Best Model Y Color

Being the “new kid on the block,” the Model Y has generated a lot of interest to say the least. And, part of this interest is related to styling—especially colors.

This has lead prospective Tesla buyers to ask questions like “what is the Best Model Y color?” Obviously, this is a subjective question—there’s no doubt about that.

But, there are some scientific truths that persist. For example—it’s well-known that lighter colors tend to hide scratches, dirt, etc. better than darker colors. It’s also widely known that darker colors tend to reflect more light (when clean), and look better in low light situations.

To help prospective used Tesla buyers (and anyone doing research about Model Y colors) learn about which colors may be better (or worse) in certain situations, we’ve answered a variety of Model Y color questions below.

2021 Model Y Long Range AWD Solid Black
2021 Model Y Long Range AWD Solid Black

Best Tesla Model Y Color for Hiding Scratches

As we’ve previously mentioned in this guide, light colors are king when it comes to hiding scratches, and there are a few reasons for this.

When scratches occur, they often strip away the base coat and expose the primer, which is a lighter gray or white color. So, it stands to reason that if you already have a gray or white color that the difference between the primer and the base coat will be less noticeable—hence the advantage to silver or gray colors.

Because Silver Metallic is no longer being produced (unfortunately), we’re going to say that Pearl White Multi-Coat is best Tesla Model Y color for hiding scratches.

Easiest Tesla Model Y Color to Take Care Of (Or Keep Clean)

As we’ve mentioned a few times in this guide, lighter colors are the best when it comes to hiding imperfections. And the two lightest Tesla colors are Silver Metallic, and Pearl White Multi-Coat. So, it stands to reason that one of these colors would be the easiest to take care of.

Obviously Silver Metallic is unavailable in the 2021 model year, so that leaves Pearl White Multi-Coat as the lightest, easiest Tesla Model Y color to take care of.

Best-Looking Model Y Color in Daylight

Tesla colors that look the best in daylight aren’t always the same ones that look the best in evening or night light, and there’s a reason for this—direct sunlight brings out certain aspects of colors that other lighting scenarios don’t.

So, the colors that typically look the best in direct sunlight are those that have a little extra something to reveal. That said—we think that Deep Blue Metallic is the best Model Y color during the daytime (and in direct sunlight). On overcast days, Deep Blue Metallic can look a little purple-ish, but in direct sunlight it really shines as a radiant, electric blue color—and it gets our vote for best-looking Model Y color during the day.

Best-Looking Model Y Color at Night Time

Generally speaking, we like darker colors at night as they exude a sort of elegance that lighter colors just don’t. That said, our opinion changes a bit with the Model Y.

We truly think that the best color on Model Y at night is Pearl White Multi-Coat. There’s just something about the curves of the Model Y, coupled with the blacked out trim, that really comes to life in darker light. Of course, this is our opinion, but we stand by it 100%!

Best Overall Tesla Model Y Color

Again—this is very subjective to say the least, but our vote goes to Pearl White Multi-Coat. There’s just something about it that looks great with the blacked out trim and wheels (AKA storm trooper look), combined with white’s ability to hide imperfections as a color in general.

If we had to choose a runner up, it would be Red Multi-Coat, cause there’s just something about Tesla’s Multi-Coat process that generates depth in paint that looks amazing. But the real winner here—the best Tesla Model Y color—is definitely Pearl White Multi-Coat.

Tesla Cybertruck Mars
Tesla Cybertruck Mars

Tesla Cybertruck Colors

The Tesla Cybertruck shocked the world during the unveil event in November 2019 with its futuristic styling and sharp curves. And one of the most interesting things about it is that it doesn’t really have a color—it’s essentially a bare metal vehicle.

We’re not sure if it will have a clearcoat, or will just be the bare metal—but one thing we do know for sure is that it looks incredibly badass. There has been some Twitter chatter from Elon about a matte black Cybertruck in addition to the stainless steel option—which would be awesome.

In terms of the interior, we don’t expect that it’ll break much from the current Model 3/Y convention of All Black/Black and White, but that does remain to be seen to a certain extent. The current concept interior shows All Black, but we’re going to assume (given the center display similar to Model 3/Y), that the interior colors will continue along Tesla’s current ideology.

Tesla Cybertruck Stainless Steel
Tesla Cybertruck Stainless Steel

2021 Cybertruck Colors

As mentioned above—while we don’t know exactly what the Cybertruck interior/exterior colors will be, the colors listed below represent our best guess based on currently available information.

Exterior Colors

Stainless Steel
Stainless Steel
Matte Black Stainless Steel
Matte Black Stainless Steel

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Best Cybertruck Colors

With the Cybertruck not being released yet, all we can do is speculate. That said—it’s pretty clear (given the prototype/concept truck), that stainless steel will be an option.

Also, given some of Elon’s tweets about colors, it’s likely that a matte black (or some other option) will be available.

Not knowing which colors will ultimately be available makes it difficult determine the #1 color choice. However, we really feel like stainless steel will be the easiest to take care of, the best-looking, and best choice all around—and based on the concept, we know it’s going to be available. So—we’re going to say that stainless steel is the best Tesla Cybertruck color, hands down.

Tesla Roadster White
Tesla Roadster White

Tesla Roadster Colors

Tesla’s Roadster was arguably the car that started it all—being produced from 2008 to 2012—it was the spearhead that led Tesla to produce the Model S, Model 3, and a ton of mainstream vehicles.

Some people tend to forget about the original Roadster, given Tesla’s incredibly amazing and diverse current lineup—but it’s really “the car that started it all.”

In terms of exterior and interior color options, Tesla’s Roadster had the widest range of any Tesla production vehicle.

2008 Roadster 1.0 Radiant Red
2008 Roadster 1.0 Radiant Red

2008 Tesla Roadster Colors (P1)

The first Tesla Roadster was an engineering marvel—believe it or not. It would’ve been easier to build a car from scratch than for Elon and JB to turn a Lotus Elise into an electric car.

That said, the original Tesla Roadster was fun, fast, and most importantly—proved that an electric car was possible on a relatively aggressive production scale.

In terms of color options, there were a wide variety of colors (13-15, depending upon the year) on the original Tesla Roadster compared to the core five colors that Tesla now uses. Interior color options were also quite broad at nine colors throughout its production course.

Exterior Colors

Arctic White
Arctic White
Brilliant Yellow Metallic
Brilliant Yellow Metallic
Electric Blue
Electric Blue
Fusion Red
Fusion Red
Glacier Blue Metallic
Glacier Blue Metallic
Jet Black
Jet Black
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Racing Green
Racing Green
Radiant Red
Radiant Red
Sterling Silver
Sterling Silver
Thunder Gray
Thunder Gray
Twilight Blue Metallic
Twilight Blue Metallic
Very Orange
Very Orange

Interior Colors

Beige
Beige
Black
Black
Cream
Cream
Dark Gray
Dark Gray
Light Gray
Light Gray
Orange
Orange
Red
Red
Saddle
Saddle
Yellow
Yellow

2009 Tesla Roadster Colors (2.0)

In its second year of production, there weren’t many changes across the 2.0 version of Tesla’s Roadster. The most notable change came in the form of a slight increase in range (244 miles, up from 231 miles) and a slight increase in horsepower (288, up from 248).

The Roadster still retained most of its features from 2008, including the same 53 kWh battery pack. Colors (both interior and exterior) remained unchanged.

Exterior Colors

Arctic White
Arctic White
Brilliant Yellow Metallic
Brilliant Yellow Metallic
Electric Blue
Electric Blue
Fusion Red
Fusion Red
Glacier Blue Metallic
Glacier Blue Metallic
Jet Black
Jet Black
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Racing Green
Racing Green
Radiant Red
Radiant Red
Sterling Silver
Sterling Silver
Thunder Gray
Thunder Gray
Twilight Blue Metallic
Twilight Blue Metallic
Very Orange
Very Orange

Interior Colors

Beige
Beige
Black
Black
Cream
Cream
Dark Gray
Dark Gray
Light Gray
Light Gray
Orange
Orange
Red
Red
Saddle
Saddle
Yellow
Yellow

2008 Tesla Roadster Colors (P1)

Feature-wise, there weren’t many changes to the 2010 Tesla Roadster—with most options staying the same.

The battery pack retained the 53 kWh size, and there were also no meaningful changes to the performance or range of the vehicle.

Colors (both interior and exterior) were also unchanged for the 2010 model year.

Exterior Colors

Arctic White
Arctic White
Brilliant Yellow Metallic
Brilliant Yellow Metallic
Electric Blue
Electric Blue
Fusion Red
Fusion Red
Glacier Blue Metallic
Glacier Blue Metallic
Jet Black
Jet Black
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Racing Green
Racing Green
Radiant Red
Radiant Red
Sterling Silver
Sterling Silver
Thunder Gray
Thunder Gray
Twilight Blue Metallic
Twilight Blue Metallic
Very Orange
Very Orange

Interior Colors

Beige
Beige
Black
Black
Cream
Cream
Dark Gray
Dark Gray
Light Gray
Light Gray
Orange
Orange
Red
Red
Saddle
Saddle
Yellow
Yellow

2011 Tesla Roadster Colors (2.5 Sport)

2011 saw a few changes to the Tesla Roadster in the form of a sport upgrade that garnered the vehicle a quicker 3.7 second 0-60 time, and a few extra lb feet of torque (295 up from 280).

Tesla also added two additional exterior colors—Atomic Red, and Lightning Green, bringing the total number of exterior color choices to a whopping 15.

The interior color options were unchanged and remained at eight choices. No other meaningful changes were made to the 2011 Tesla Roadster compared to the previous year.

Exterior Colors

Arctic White
Arctic White
Atomic Red
Atomic Red
Brilliant Blue Metallic
Brilliant Blue Metallic
Electric Blue
Electric Blue
Fusion Red
Fusion Red
Glacier Blue Metallic
Glacier Blue Metallic
Jet Black
Jet Black
Lightning Green
Lightning Green
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Racing Green
Racing Green
Radiant Red
Radiant Red
Sterling Silver
Sterling Silver
Thunder Gray
Thunder Gray
Twilight Blue Metallic
Twilight Blue Metallic
Very Orange
Very Orange

Interior Colors

Beige
Beige
Black
Black
Cream
Cream
Dark Gray
Dark Gray
Light Gray
Light Gray
Orange
Orange
Red
Red
Saddle
Saddle
Yellow
Yellow

2012 Tesla Roadster Colors (3.0)

2012 was the last production year of the Tesla Roadster, although they did offer an R80 battery upgrade two years later that gave it much more range (340 miles) but didn’t improve acceleration much in any meaningful way.

For the final year of Tesla’s Roadster, the interior and exterior color options were unchanged and the production program was wound down to focus on the first year of the Model S. The total number of exterior colors available for the final year of the Roadster remained at 15, and the total number of interior colors available remained at eight.

Exterior Colors

Arctic White
Arctic White
Atomic Red
Atomic Red
Brilliant Blue Metallic
Brilliant Blue Metallic
Electric Blue
Electric Blue
Fusion Red
Fusion Red
Glacier Blue Metallic
Glacier Blue Metallic
Jet Black
Jet Black
Lightning Green
Lightning Green
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Racing Green
Racing Green
Radiant Red
Radiant Red
Sterling Silver
Sterling Silver
Thunder Gray
Thunder Gray
Twilight Blue Metallic
Twilight Blue Metallic
Very Orange
Very Orange

Interior Colors

Beige
Beige
Black
Black
Cream
Cream
Dark Gray
Dark Gray
Light Gray
Light Gray
Orange
Orange
Red
Red
Saddle
Saddle
Yellow
Yellow

2020/2021 Tesla Roadster Colors

The world was shocked in 2017 when Tesla revealed the new Roadster (also called the 2020 Roadster, due to it’s supposed first year of production—2020) to the world.

With a 1/4 time of 8.9 seconds in the base model, a range of 620 miles, and a 0-60 time of 1.9 seconds, Tesla touted specs that seemed impossible in production cars.

Because the 2020 Roadster isn’t in production yet, we can only speculate on the actual colors that will be available—but they have shown the prototypes in some form of white, and also in what appears to be Tesla’s iconic Red Multi-Coat.

Given Tesla’s adherence to their core five colors (as seen across the entire lineup), we’re predicting that the 2020 (now 2021) Tesla Roadster will be available in the colors listed below.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Solid Black
Solid Black
Jet Black
Jet Black
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Racing Green
Racing Green

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Black and White
Black and White

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Best Tesla Roadster Color

We’ll cut right to the chase here—Red Multi-Coat is the best color for any Tesla Roadster (old or new), hands down.

There’s a reason that most Ferraris are red, and also a reason a saying exists that says “all Corvettes are red—the rest are just mistakes.” Red truly is the best color on a sports car, and we don’t see any exception here with the Roadster. In fact, it’s likely that Tesla feels the same way as the Roadster in all of their marketing materials and the prototype Roadster are always red.

2010 Roadster 2.5 Base Electric Blue
2010 Roadster 2.5 Base Electric Blue

Tesla Semi Truck Colors

The Tesla Semi is an interesting vehicle to say the least; a 0-60 time of 20 seconds might sound slow, but that’s with an 80k lb load!

And the most interesting part about the trucks is that they’ll likely be fully autonomous at some point, not only saving the fuel cost vs. a diesel semi truck, but also saving the labor cost as well with safer driving that can run almost all day and night.

But what about colors? Which colors will be offered on the Tesla Semi? Similar to the 2020 Roadster, no one knows for sure, but we’ve seen renders of red, black, white, and even silver—so we’re going to go with our gut and guess that Tesla will stick to their core five colors for branding and logistics at this point.

Exterior Colors

Deep Blue Metallic
Deep Blue Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Midnight Silver Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Obsidian Black Metallic
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Pearl White Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Red Multi-Coat
Silver Metallic
Silver Metallic
Solid Black
Solid Black

Interior Colors

All Black
All Black

(Vegan Leather/Synthetic)

Tesla ATV Colors

Most people watching Tesla’s November 2019 Cybertruck event were shocked when an all-electric ATV drove out and up into the back of the truck, with Elon casually announcing that they’d be making an ATV too.

This prompted a big response from the Tesla community which instantly went abuzz with the news. People were wondering how and where they could order the “Cyberquad” as many chose to call it.

Elon later stated it would be an “add on” option to anyone buying the Cybertruck. However, this raises the question—does the Tesla ATV/Cyberquad come in different colors?

From what we can tell—no, it doesn’t—and this doesn’t appear to be changing anytime soon. Likely the only color available on the ATV will be stainless steel, although it’s possible that if the Cybertruck comes in different finishes, the ATV will match it. Only time will tell for sure!

Your Tesla Color Questions Answered

Custom Tesla Colors—Can You Get Them?

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could just order a custom color directly from Tesla?
Unfortunately, you can’t—Tesla has really limited the amount of colors available to help improve production and people don’t seem to mind—their core five colors (Pearl White Multi-Coat, Solid Black, Midnight Silver Metallic, Deep Blue Metallic, and Red Multi-Coat) have become somewhat iconic at this point too.
If you’re looking to change the color on your Tesla, your best bet is to order the “free color” (currently Pearl White Multi-Coat) and wrap it the color you want.

Discontinued Tesla Colors—Are They Still Available?

What about colors that Tesla has discontinued? Can you still get them?
Unfortunately there’s no luck to be had here either. In fact, we spoke with someone at Tesla HQ to try and place a custom order for a Model 3 in Obsidian Black Metallic (one of their best colors) and were told this wasn’t possible.
If you want to learn more about creative ways to get discontinued Tesla colors, check out our blog post on that here.

Tesla Wrap Colors

Gone are the days of custom paint jobs—nowadays it’s much easier (and cheaper) to just wrap a car any color that you want, and it often ends up looking as good (or better) than custom paint.
Wrap technology has come so far that there are a lot of really cool options. For example, you can get a lot of different matte finish wraps on your Tesla, as well as translucent wraps, and even semi-transparent wraps that give the existing paint finish on your car a “frosted” look.
Not only are wraps faster and cheaper than paint, but you can also change them out if you don’t like the look later on—or if you want to revert to the factory color to sell your Tesla.
Hands down, wraps are the best way to go and gaining more popularity every day. With that said, let’s take a look at some of the different wrap options for each Tesla model.

Tesla Model S Wraps—Are They Worth It?

Tesla Model S wraps are a great way to change the color of your Model S and protect the paint at the same time.
The curves of the Model S look really good in matte finish wraps including grays and satin colors. If you’re considering getting a wrap on your Model S, those colors are definitely something to think about.

Tesla Model X Wraps—Is This the Best Way to Change the Color?

Some people think that the Model X can’t be wrapped because of the way the gull wing doors operate, but the truth is that it can be wrapped just as easily as any other car—and it’s a great way to change the color.
Similar to the Model S, we’re fans of the matte wraps on the Model X, particularly gray and satin colors.

Tesla Model 3 Wraps—Cost, Options & More

Model 3 wraps look amazing and quite popular. Generally speaking, they seem to cost about $500-$800 for a clear bra, $1,500 or so for the full front, and about $3,500 to $5,000 (or more in some cases) for the full vehicle wrap.
There are a lot of different options for Model 3 wraps as well, but we’re slightly partial to the frosted wraps on the Model 3 and think they look great with the vehicle’s curves.

Tesla Model Y Wraps Explained

Although the Model Y hasn’t been out that long, owners are still passionate about wrapping them! We’ve seen a variety of colors and wrap options on the Model Y, with our favorites being the frosted versions like the Model 3.
The cost to wrap a Model Y is similar to a Model 3, maybe just a bit more expensive in some cases due to the slightly larger vehicle size.

Tesla Roadster Wraps—Should You Wrap Your Roadster?

We think the Roadster (especially the 2020 Roadster) is a work of art and doesn’t really need a wrap—but some people will definitely choose to wrap them when they come out (likely to protect the paint in addition to customizing the vehicles).
To wrap or not is really a personal decision—outside of a clear wrap, we vote no, but we might also be surprised to see that some of the Roadster wraps look great—only time will tell!

Tesla Cybertruck Wraps—Can You Wrap the Cybertruck?

There’s been a lot of buzz about wrapping the Cybertruck because of its big flat surfaces—it really just begs for a wrap (and some people don’t care for the stainless steel look).
We’re actually huge fans of the stainless look, so it’s not something that we’d want to cover up—but undoubtedly, some people will choose to wrap it, and we’re waiting to see how that turns out. It may even be easy to DIY a Cybertruck wrap since the surfaces are so flat.

Does Tesla Have Its Own Wrapping Service?

Tesla does in fact have its own vehicle wrapping service in China—and it’s possible that this may come to the US at some point as well.
But for now, third-party venders are the only way to get your Tesla wrapped stateside.

Other Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About Tesla Colors

This is one of our biggest, baddest ultimate guides ever—that’s for sure! But we wanted to be as thorough as possible and answer every question out there related to Tesla colors.

So, we created this FAQ section to answer questions being asked across the web about Tesla colors. Let’s jump in!

What are the best-selling Tesla colors?

Tesla’s most popular paint color is Solid Black. This is followed in popularity by Midnight Silver Metallic, Deep Blue Metallic, Red Multi-Coat, and Pearl White Multi-Coat.

However, Pearl White Multi-Coat (now the “free” color on Model 3/Y), is gaining traction quickly.

Which Tesla colors are the easiest to take care of?

Lighter colors are always easiest to keep clean, making Silver Metallic and Pearl White Multi-Coat the easiest Tesla colors to take care of.

Which Tesla colors hide dirt the best?

Lighter colors tend to hide dirt the best (even though this is somewhat counterintuitive). This means that Silver Metallic and Pearl White Multi-Coat are the Tesla colors that hide dirt the best.

Which Tesla colors hide scratches and dings the best?

Again, lighter colors are the best here—and we’ll say it again—Silver Metallic (unfortunately discontinued) and Pearl White Multi-Coat are the best Tesla colors for hiding scratches and dings.

Does Tesla have problems with “soft paint?”

Almost all automotive manufacturers have struggled with soft paint at certain points (just do an Internet search for soft paint + any manufacturer’s name).

But there is no evidence that we’re aware of to suggest that Tesla has any trouble with paint quality more than any other auto manufacturer.

Does Tesla have problems with paint blemishes and orange peel from the factory?

All automotive manufacturers struggle with paint quality from time to time, but we haven’t been able to see any evidence that Tesla struggles here more than anyone else.

What colors do Tesla cars come in?

Currently Tesla vehicles come in the following five colors:

  • Solid Black
  • Pearl White Multi-Coat
  • Midnight Silver Metallic
  • Deep Blue Metallic
  • Red Multi-Coat

Which Model 3 color should I get?

This is a really individual choice, but we think Solid Black is a great choice if you want something really sleek looking.

Red Multi-Coat is great for a sporty look, and Pearl White Multi-Coat is great for hiding scratches. Deep Blue Metallic looks amazing in the sunlight and Midnight Silver Metallic is also a great all-around color.

Our all-time favorite Tesla color is Obsidian Black Metallic, but it is no longer available.

Which Model Y color should I get?

We think that all the colors are great—but our personal favorite Model Y color is Pearl White Multi-Coat for that quintessential storm trooper look.

What is the most popular Tesla color?

Solid Black is the most popular Tesla color over time, but Pearl White Multi-Coat is gaining on it.

Can I change the color of my Tesla?

Yes, you can! The best way to do this is by getting it wrapped.

What if I can’t decide on a Tesla color?

If you can’t decide on a Tesla color, we recommend spending some time playing with Tesla’s color configurator, and also looking at other real pictures (non-rendered) of Teslas online to see what colors you like.

It’s also helpful to visit a Tesla store and check out the colors in person as they may look different to your eyes than in pictures. If you want to see a wide range of Tesla colors, you can also visit a local Tesla group meetup in your area.

Does the color of a Tesla affect the cost?

Yes, it does. Currently the cost structure of Tesla colors is as follows:

  • Pearl White Multi-Coat (included)
  • Solid Black ($1,000)
  • Midnight Silver Metallic ($1,000)
  • Deep Blue Metallic ($1,000)
  • Red Multi-Coat ($2,000)

Tesla colors also affect the resale value as well, with some studies finding that Red Multi-Coat, Pearl White Multi-Coat, and Silver Metallic had the best resale value compared to other Tesla colors.

Does the Tesla roof/sunroof change color when wet?

Yes—they do! Well, they don’t actually change color, but they appear to change color.

This is due to the way the special glass reflects certain wavelengths of light.

How many colors does Tesla have?

Currently Tesla has five colors that are available:

  • Solid Black
  • Pearl White Multi-Coat
  • Midnight Silver Metallic
  • Deep Blue Metallic
  • Red Multi-Coat

How many blue colors does Tesla have?

Tesla currently has one blue color available—Deep Blue Metallic. They have had more in the past, but this has been reduced to streamline production and lower repair costs.

How much does it cost to change the color of a Tesla?

The cost of Tesla colors is as follows:

  • Pearl White Multi-Coat (included)
  • Solid Black ($1,000)
  • Midnight Silver Metallic ($1,000)
  • Deep Blue Metallic ($1,000)
  • Red Multi-Coat ($2,000)

If you’re considering wrapping your Tesla, the cost will be anywhere from $2,000 on the low end to over $5,000.

Is red the best Tesla color?

Tesla’s Red Multi-Coat is one of our favorite colors. It looks great on the Model 3 Performance with a Black and White interior, as well as the Model S Performance with an All Black interior and has become quite iconic as it’s used in most of their marketing materials and pictures.

Is Tesla black hard to maintain?

All black colors are hard to maintain, no matter which car company makes them. They show dirt, scratches, fingerprints, and imperfections very easily. Tesla used to make a color that was a metallic black which helped avoid some of these problems called Obsidian Black Metallic, but it has been discontinued since 2018.

That said, if you want a black Tesla and are looking to make it easy to care for, we recommend getting a full paint protection film (PPF) wrap with a 3M or Xpel certified installer.

Where can I find a used Tesla in a specific color?

Right here on Find My Electric! We’ve got a proprietary color searching system that allows you to search for general colors like “black” or Tesla-specific colors like Obsidian Black Metallic with just a few clicks (or taps). Check our used Tesla listings and find a Tesla in the exact color you want!

What is the best Tesla interior color?

We think that All Black is the best Tesla interior color—it’s sleek, subtle, and classy-looking.

Not sure which used Tesla you should buy? Wondering where to begin?

ULTIMATE GUIDE TO USED TESLAS

Everything You Wanted to Know About the Tesla Model S, 3, X & Y